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Autumn has finally arrived! September Equinox is TODAY

Today is the September Equinox, marking the first day of fall in the Northern Hemisphere

It’s finally time to put away your summer shorts, dust off your sweaters and break out the pumpkin spice lattes – fall is officially here!

Today is the September Equinox, marking the first day of autumn in the Northern Hemisphere.

“The September Equinox is a time that welcomes Earthlings into a new season,” NASA explained.

“To those in the northern hemisphere, enjoy the onset of milder weather and say hello to early sunsets and late sunrises.”

Today is the September Equinox, marking the first day of fall in the Northern Hemisphere

Today is the September Equinox, marking the first day of fall in the Northern Hemisphere

During an equinox, the sun shines directly above the equator, resulting in nearly equal amounts of day and night around the world.

During an equinox, the sun shines directly above the equator, resulting in nearly equal amounts of day and night around the world.

What is meteorological autumn?

The meteorological seasons are obtained by dividing the year into four periods consisting of three months each.

These seasons are divided to coincide with our Gregorian calendar, making it easy to observe and forecast weather to compare seasonal and monthly statistics.

According to the weather calendar, the first day of autumn is always September 1; ending November 30.

The seasons are defined as spring (March, April, May), summer (June, July, August), autumn (September, October, November) and winter (December, January, February).

Source: Met Office

Two distinct dates can be used to mark the beginning of fall in calendars: astronomical fall and meteorological fall.

Meteorological autumn is guided by annual temperature cycles.

“Weather seasons are obtained by dividing the year into four periods consisting of three months each,” explains the Met Office.

“These seasons are divided to coincide with our Gregorian calendar, which facilitates weather observation and forecasting to compare seasonal and monthly statistics.

“According to the weather calendar, the first day of autumn is always September 1; ending November 30.

“The seasons are defined as spring (March, April, May), summer (June, July, August), autumn (September, October, November) and winter (December, January, February).”

Meanwhile, astronomical fall – much like today’s equinox – is defined by Earth’s journey around the Sun.

During an equinox, the sun shines directly above the equator, resulting in nearly equal amounts of day and night around the world.

However, starting today, the sun will rise gradually later and set earlier in the northern hemisphere.

Earth's seasons are caused by the tilted axis of our planet, which always points in the same direction.  As the Earth orbits the sun, the angle of sunlight received by the northern and southern hemispheres is different

Earth’s seasons are caused by the tilted axis of our planet, which always points in the same direction. As the Earth orbits the sun, the angle of sunlight received by the northern and southern hemispheres is different

When are the next autumnal equinoxes?
Year autumn begins Autumn is ending
2022 friday september 23 Wednesday, December 21
2023 Saturday September 23 Friday, December 22
2024 Sunday September 22 saturday 21 december
2025 monday september 22 Sunday, December 21

Unfortunately, this means that the days will be shorter and the nightfall longer.

The reverse is true in the southern hemisphere, where days will begin to last longer and nightfall shorter.

If you’re in the UK, it might be time to get out the sweaters and your umbrella.

“Autumn is normally associated with falling temperatures and approaching nights as winter approaches,” advises the Met Office.

“Autumn in the UK can often bring choppy weather and towards the end of the season can often bring stormy conditions with strong gales from Atlantic lows moving over the UK.”

If you're in the UK, it might be time to get out the sweaters and your umbrella.

If you’re in the UK, it might be time to get out the sweaters and your umbrella. ‘Autumn is normally associated with falling temperatures and approaching nights as winter approaches,’ advises the Met Office

Earth’s seasons are caused by the tilted axis of our planet, which always points in the same direction.

As the Earth orbits the sun, the angle of sunlight received by the northern and southern hemispheres is different.

“At the June (summer) solstice in the northern hemisphere, sunlight is more direct, so it warms the ground more efficiently,” explained Mitzi Adams, deputy director of Marshall’s heliophysics and planetary sciences branch.

“In the southern hemisphere, sunlight is less direct (in winter), which means the ground doesn’t heat up as easily.”

This year, fall will end and astronomical winter will begin on December 21, 2022.

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