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Boris Johnson among latest MPs to swear allegiance to King Charles as Speaker issues warning

Boris Johnson lined up to be sworn in as the new monarch as the House of Commons sat for the first time since Her Majesty's state funeral

Boris joins MPs swearing allegiance to King Charles in the Commons – with a Cabinet minister taking the oath in Welsh – as the Speaker warns anti-monarchists they will be photographed if they cross their fingers

  • Boris Johnson among latest group of MPs to pledge allegiance to King Charles III
  • Cabinet Minister Robert Buckland is sworn in twice – in English and Welsh
  • Speaker warns MPs to behave after some have already crossed their fingers

Boris Johnson was among the last group of MPs to pledge allegiance to King Charles today following the death of Queen Elizabeth.

The former Prime Minister lined up this morning to be sworn in to the new monarch as the House of Commons sat for the first time since Her Majesty’s state funeral.

Holding the King James Bible, the former prime minister swore “to be faithful and to bear true allegiance” to Charles.

Among the Cabinet ministers to pledge themselves to the King, Welsh Secretary Robert Buckland was subsequently sworn in twice – once in England and once in Welsh.

Before the final swearing-in of MPs, Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle reminded members of the House of Commons that the event was being filmed by television cameras.

“Anything said or done by members may appear on television or be picked up by microphones,” he said.

In previous years, some MPs have courted controversy by crossing their fingers while pledging allegiance to the monarch.

Former Labor Secretary Tony Banks, a Republican, sadly crossed his fingers when he took the oath of allegiance to Queen Elizabeth.

SNP MP Steven Bonnar has been accused of insulting Her Majesty when he repeated the cross shot after the 2019 general election.

Boris Johnson lined up to be sworn in as the new monarch as the House of Commons sat for the first time since Her Majesty's state funeral

Boris Johnson lined up to be sworn in as the new monarch as the House of Commons sat for the first time since Her Majesty’s state funeral

Among the Cabinet Ministers to pledge themselves to the King, Welsh Secretary Robert Buckland was subsequently sworn in twice - once in England and once in Welsh

Among the Cabinet Ministers to pledge themselves to the King, Welsh Secretary Robert Buckland was subsequently sworn in twice – once in England and once in Welsh

Tony Banks

steven bonnar

Labour’s Tony Banks (left) sadly crossed his fingers as he took the oath of allegiance to the Queen. SNP’s Steven Bonnar repeated the crossover after the 2019 election

Members of Parliament are sworn in after each general election – or if they win their seat in a by-election – so that they can sit, speak in debate, vote and receive a salary.

They can either swear using a religious text or make a non-religious affirmation.

The taking of the oath also takes place after the death of the monarch.

For members of the House of Lords it is a requirement, but for MPs it is optional and failure to do so has no effect on their seat or participation in business.

The wording of the oath means that MPs who took the oath after the last general election had already pledged allegiance to the Queen’s heirs and successors, meaning they do not necessarily have to do so again at this stage.

Mr Johnson was the 15th MP on Wednesday to swear allegiance to Charles.

Transport Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan was first, followed by Interior Secretary Suella Braverman.

A total of 31 MPs had already pledged their allegiance to Charles at the first swearing-in session on September 10.

Sir Lindsay Hoyle opened this morning’s proceedings by thanking Parliamentary staff, members of the Armed Forces and others for their efforts during the Queen’s bequest and funeral.

He told MPs: “I would also like to express my gratitude to everyone who has helped to ensure that the events of the past 10 days or so have been handled with such dignity and brilliance, albeit in the circumstances sadder.”

In his warning to MPs to behave during today’s debates, the Speaker added: ‘I remind members that the taking of the oath is recorded by TV cameras, anything said or done by MPs may appear on TV or be picked up on microphones.’

The Scottish Nationalist Alba Party revealed its two MPs, Neale Hanvey and Kenny MacAskill, would not renew their vows to the monarch today as they said ‘it is the people who are sovereign’.

Normal business in the Commons will resume on Thursday.

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