Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

6T News6T News

Latest News

Church minister, 70, takes her siblings to London's High Court in a bitter £900k inheritance battle

Reverend Anne Lettice, 70, has sued her five siblings in a bitter £900,000 inheritance dispute.  Anne, pictured, claims she was the primary carer for her late mother, Margaret, and says her £105,000 inheritance did not constitute a 'reasonable disposition' for her to buy a new place to live

A church minister is locked in a bitter £900.00 battle in the High Court with his siblings claiming they ganged up to deceive her of her rightful inheritance from their mother.

Reverend Anne Lettice, 70, sued her five siblings after their mother Margaret Lettice died aged 99 in 2019, dividing her fortune among all her children and grandchildren.

But the inheritance split has sparked a vitriolic family feud between siblings, who are now bickering over how much money from their late mother they will get.

Reverend Lettice, who had lived with her mother in her £875,000 home in north London, was left with an inheritance of around £105,000 but insists it left her unable to support herself house or pay for their daily needs.

Suing her family in court, she says the will did not make ‘reasonable provisions’ for her and she should get more, having spent nearly two decades caring for her elderly mother after her son died. father, Frederick, in 2001.

And she claims her five siblings ganged up on her to try to beat her claim to more money from the estate.

But her siblings deny she was their mother’s primary carer and say she is no more indebted to them for the inheritance money.

Reverend Anne Lettice, 70, has sued her five siblings in a bitter £900,000 inheritance dispute.  Anne, pictured, claims she was the primary carer for her late mother, Margaret, and says her £105,000 inheritance did not constitute a 'reasonable disposition' for her to buy a new place to live

Reverend Anne Lettice, 70, has sued her five siblings in a bitter £900,000 inheritance dispute. Anne, pictured, claims she was the primary carer for her late mother, Margaret, and says her £105,000 inheritance did not constitute a ‘reasonable disposition’ for her to buy a new place to live

But Reverend Lettice's family accused her of being 'mostly absent' from Margaret's home and claimed she failed to provide the 99-year-old with '24-hour care'.  Pictured: Brian Lettice, Sylvia Ricks, Linda Lettice and Nina Ricks (Sylvia's daughter) outside the High Court in London

But Reverend Lettice’s family accused her of being ‘mostly absent’ from Margaret’s home and claimed she failed to provide the 99-year-old with ’24-hour care’. Pictured: Brian Lettice, Sylvia Ricks, Linda Lettice and Nina Ricks (Sylvia’s daughter) outside the High Court in London

The High Court in London heard mother-of-one Reverend Lettice is a former mental health nurse, who was ordained as a Reverend in the US and who for more than two decades has dedicated her life to God.

She was living in the United States when her father Frederick fell ill in 2001 and moved back to London, staying with her mother at her home in Haringey, north London, after her father’s death.

Reverend Lettice told the court she provided ‘around-the-clock care’ for her mother, helping her with meals, dressing and medication, and being there for anything she needed. she needed.

However, when Margaret died after a battle with bowel cancer in 2019, Reverend Lettice was threatened with eviction from the house she had called home for 17 years, she said.

Her mother’s will, signed in 2014, ordered the sale of the four-bedroom house, with the proceeds to be divided among all the families of her six children.

Reverend Lettice was due to receive around £105,000, her brother Brian, 63, and retired nurse sister Linda Lettice, 61, each receiving £149,000, her sister Sylvia Ricks £105,000 and Australian brothers Frederick, 64 years, and Peter £61,000 each.

Margaret’s grandchildren would also benefit from obtaining shares, so they would effectively split the proceeds of the house and a small cash amount equally among her children’s families.

But the will sparked a bitter fight, with the Reverend Lettice launching a claim for a bigger payout from the estate than his siblings.

She claims that she needs more money than others to buy a new house and cover her expenses.

Giving evidence however, his Tottenham-based piano tuner brother Brian cast doubt on Reverend Lettice’s claim to have been his mother’s 24-hour carer, telling the court she was often absent from the his mother’s home.

“She was away from the house most of the time, usually from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. each day,” he said in his testimony.

“My mother was often worried that no one knew where she was going and what she was doing.

“We still don’t know what she was doing, but she definitely wasn’t looking after my mum.”

Margaret’s grandson Samuel Lettice – who will inherit around £43,750 – told the judge in his evidence that he visited his grandmother and stayed with her when he came to the UK on her honeymoon from Australia in 2010.

He described her as “funny, outgoing and quick-witted”. She was always up early and ready to chat, he told the court, while insisting he rarely saw his Aunt Anne, who “certainly didn’t care about” Margaret when she visited.

And Margaret’s son Frederick Lettice, giving evidence via video link from Australia, claimed it was Linda – who also lived for years with her mother – who was the ‘primary carer’.

Solicitor Anna Metcalfe, representing Rev Lettice’s siblings, nieces and nephews, claimed Rev Lettice had failed to prove she did not need more than the £105,000 she had left in her mother’s will, and that Margaret had no more obligation to her than the other children.

At the center of the bitter inheritance row is this £875,000 home in Haringey, north London.  The property was Margaret's home and was sold after her death, with the money split between Margaret's six children and her grandchildren.

At the center of the bitter inheritance row is this £875,000 home in Haringey, north London. The property was Margaret’s home and was sold after her death, with the money split between Margaret’s six children and her grandchildren.

Reverend Lettice accused his siblings of

Reverend Lettice accused her siblings of ‘colluding’ against her and said their claim that she didn’t care for her late mother was a ‘total lie’. Pictured are Brian Lettice, Sylvia Ricks and Linda Lettice

Margaret had not considered herself an obligation to the Reverend Lettice, having made it clear in her will that she wanted her to leave the house so it could be sold when she died, she said.

“His testamentary intentions are important,” she continued. “They were thoughtful and clear, and she wanted all of her children to benefit equally.”

And she said nine members of Margaret’s close family had confirmed she was not being looked after ’24 hours a day’ by her daughter.

“According to their statements, not only did you not provide 24-hour care for 17 years, but you really did not provide any care,” she told the Reverend on the witness stand.

In response, Reverend Lettice said her family’s claim that she was not caring for her mother was a ‘complete lie’ and that they ganged up on her to defeat her demand for payment.

“It is obvious that they took a lawyer against me,” she told the judge.

“If you look at their statements, they pretty much all say the same thing.

“My siblings and their children took advice and made essentially the same statement.”

She said her mother had wanted all of her children to have their own home, but chose not to buy and to stay with her mother to “honor” and care for her after her son died. dad.

“I decided to stay and take care of my mother,” she said.

“My siblings had other commitments that were a priority for them, but I was in a position where I could take care of my mum. She could count on me 100%.

She said she helped her mother with food, laundry, sorting clothes, cleaning and shopping. If she was sometimes absent from the house, it was because she was rare when people visited Margaret, she said.

The Reverend agreed the house would have to be sold, but said she had requested a ‘reasonable provision’ from the estate so she could buy herself a ‘reasonable dwelling’ and cover living expenses.

Reverend Lettice did not reveal exactly how much she wanted, but said she could probably find a new home with around £160,000, although she would need more than that to cover other living expenses.

She said she currently has nothing to live on beyond a small state pension, but her siblings’ lawyer pointed out that she had not incurred any debt in the three years elapsed since the death of his mother.

The Reverend Lettice’s application was heard in London’s High Court last week by a judge, Deputy Master Katherine McQuail, but the family faced an anxious wait after they delayed making a decision until a later date.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Latest News

Official timeline December 8, 2019 – Earliest date China recognized an infection December 31st – China first reported ‘pneumonia of unknown cause’ to World...

Latest News

Puppy in charge! Dogs prefer ELECTRIC cars to petrol or diesel vehicles – the smoother ride reduces their heart rate by up to 30%...

Business

The FTSE 100 recorded its best month for two years in a boost for investors in a roller coaster year. It added another 0.8%,...

Trending News

Only one in four Russians support Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, leaked Kremlin study finds The leaked study was conducted by the Federal Kremlin...