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The Hermes headscarf featuring Buckingham Palace's stable and laid across saddle

The headscarf which was laid across the Queen's favourite pony in a poignant moment at her funeral on Monday was a 1993 Hermes design dedicated to Buckingham Palace's stables

The headscarf which was laid across the Queen’s favourite pony in a poignant moment at her funeral on Monday was a 1993 Hermes design dedicated to Buckingham Palace’s stables. 

Emma, a black pony, was spotted on the side of the road as the Queen’s body arrived at Windsor Castle earlier this week, accompanied by Terry Pendry, who has held his position as Queen’s head groom for the past 25 years.

Laid across the pony’s saddle was one of the Queen’s headscarves, an accessory in which the late monarch was often pictured when riding, travelling or watching the races.

The design, which is called The Royal Mews, features the building which has housed the Queen’s horses since 1820, as well as five different royal carriages and the Queen’s equerry. 

The choice of highly personal headscarf, appears to be another nod to the Queen’s passion for horses and riding.  

The headscarf which was laid across the Queen's favourite pony in a poignant moment at her funeral on Monday was a 1993 Hermes design dedicated to Buckingham Palace's stables

The headscarf which was laid across the Queen’s favourite pony in a poignant moment at her funeral on Monday was a 1993 Hermes design dedicated to Buckingham Palace’s stables

The Queen's last Stud Groom and Manager to Her Majesty The Queen carefully laid one of her headscarves over her favourite horse Emma as the pair went out to greet the monarch for the last time in Windsor yesterday

The Queen’s last Stud Groom and Manager to Her Majesty The Queen carefully laid one of her headscarves over her favourite horse Emma as the pair went out to greet the monarch for the last time in Windsor yesterday

The headscarf, which was called 'The Royal Mews – Buckingham Palace Hermes scarf' was featured in the 1993 Fall Winter Collection from the designer

The headscarf, which was called ‘The Royal Mews – Buckingham Palace Hermes scarf’ was featured in the 1993 Fall Winter Collection from the designer

The headscarf, which was called ‘The Royal Mews – Buckingham Palace Hermes scarf’ was featured in the 1993 Fall Winter Collection from the designer.

It was designed by Jean de Fougerolle, and was released as part of the Year of the Horse for Hermes.

It was presented to Her Majesty at the 1993 Windsor Horse Show, which was known to be one of her favourite events in the royal calendar.

The design of the scarf featured in the centre, an illustration of the Royal Mews, which has been located at Buckingham Palace since the 1820s. 

The Royal Mews is made up of a number of stables used by the royal family at Buckingham Palace. 

The design, which is called The Royal Mews, features the building which has housed the Queen's horses since 1820, flanked by the Queen's equerries

The design, which is called The Royal Mews, features the building which has housed the Queen’s horses since 1820, flanked by the Queen’s equerries 

The design, which is called The Royal Mews, features the building which has housed the Queen's horses since 1820, as well as five different royal carriages and the Queen's equerry (pictured, the Royal Mews)

The design, which is called The Royal Mews, features the building which has housed the Queen’s horses since 1820, as well as five different royal carriages and the Queen’s equerry (pictured, the Royal Mews) 

The scarf shows the entrance to the muse, with the Queen’s Equerry and Her Majesty’s Master of Horses on either side, facing one another atop two ponies. 

The Mews is also responsible for their transport and contains horses and carriages. 

The carriages are also depicted on the scarf, which shows The Gold State Coach, which transported the 25-year-old Queen Elizabeth from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Abbey on the day of her coronation on June 2, 1953.

The opulent carriage, drawn by eight of Her Majesty’s finest Windsor Grey horses, is more than 250 years old and is sumptuously upholstered in velvet and satin.

It weighs a staggering four tons and its golden exterior is covered in intricate carvings and adornments.

The scarf also features the 1902 State Landau Royal Mews carriage, which was used by Kate Middleton and Prince William, as well as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, at their royal weddings. 

The headscarf has long been a staple of the royal wardrobe with the Queen pictured sporting the accessory for decades (pictured, while riding Emma and wearing one of her headscarves)

The headscarf has long been a staple of the royal wardrobe with the Queen pictured sporting the accessory for decades (pictured, while riding Emma and wearing one of her headscarves) 

As the Monarch's body arrived in Windsor, her beloved fell pony Emma, alongside Terry Pendry, were seen standing to the side of the cortege

As the Monarch’s body arrived in Windsor, her beloved fell pony Emma, alongside Terry Pendry, were seen standing to the side of the cortege

Meanwhile it also features Queen Alexandra’s State Coach, the Irish State Coach and the Barouche. 

The carriages form a wide circle around the center, and around the outside are a number of the Queen’s horses and other staff members.   

The headscarf has long been a staple of the royal wardrobe with the Queen pictured sporting the accessory for decades. 

The Queen was often spotted with a silk scarf tied around her head, particularly when she was off-duty in Sandringham, in Norfolk. 

The Queen was known to particularly like scarf French designer Hermes, whose prices start at £175 for a headscarf.

Over the years she amassed a collection of silk designs that would be the envy of any globe-trotting fashionista. 

The pony was accompanied by the Queen's last Stud Groom and Manager to Her Majesty The Queen, Terry Pendry, has held the position for the past 25 years

The pony was accompanied by the Queen’s last Stud Groom and Manager to Her Majesty The Queen, Terry Pendry, has held the position for the past 25 years

Terry Pendry respectfully bowed his head as the Queen's body arrived in Windsor for her Committal Service, while Emma stood quietly by his side

Terry Pendry respectfully bowed his head as the Queen’s body arrived in Windsor for her Committal Service, while Emma stood quietly by his side 

Emma and Terry were seen respectfully standing by the side of the Cortege around the Queen's hearse as she arrived in Windsor

Emma and Terry were seen respectfully standing by the side of the Cortege around the Queen’s hearse as she arrived in Windsor 

She was believed to have a collection of their vintage pieces, as well as some custom options.

Her collection includes graphic 1960s prints, paisley prints, traditional florals and even a dog-patterned number in a nod to her beloved pets.

As well as bringing a touch of character to any outfit, the headscarf also serves a practical purpose, protecting the Queen’s carefully coiffed hair from the wind, rain and snow. 

As the Monarch’s body arrived in Windsor, her beloved fell pony Emma, alongside Terry Pendry, were seen standing to the side of the cortege. 

Terry bowed as the hearse passed him, with Emma at his side during the poignant moment. 

Yesterday, speaking exclusively to MailOnline Mr Pendry, 72, who has been head groom at Windsor for 28 years and regularly rode with the Queen revealed how she had ridden Fell pony Emma the last time back in July. 

Mr Pendry, who attended the service at St George’s Chapel, and who lives on the estate, said: ‘It was an honour and privilege to have Emma with me to say goodbye to Her Majesty for the last time.

‘The Queen adored Emma and rode her for more than 20 years so it was only right she should have been there, and she behaved impeccably.

‘I think she probably had some sort of sixth sense that Her Majesty wouldn’t be riding her anymore and she did her proud by standing there so respectfully.’

He went on: ‘The Queen always rode with a white sheepskin saddle, it was her favourite, so I made sure Emma had that on as well.

‘Then for the finishing touch I put Her Majesty’s Hermes headscarf on the saddle. It was her favourite and had the horses and carriages printed on it.

‘Less is more if you ask me. I could have put her riding crop and gloves, but I just thought the headscarf was the perfect touch.’

Mr Pendry said: ‘I’ve been riding with the Queen for years and the last time she was on Emma was back on July 18 – two days before she left for Balmoral.

‘It’s a memory I shall never forget, and I tell you something, the Queen may have been frail as any 96-year-old would be, but she was still as sharp as anything, she was crystal clear.

‘I was right by her side and there was no indication that anything was wrong with her. The Queen was an incredible lady who selflessly dedicated herself to the service of this country and the commonwealth.

‘It’s been my privilege to have been a loyal servant of the Queen and I hope to carry on my work for the King and there is lots of work to be done.’

Mr Pendry, who was awarded the LVO and BEM for his services, added: ‘I’m sad to say that I don’t think we shall ever seen anyone like the Queen again and there are no words to express how much I shall miss her.

‘All I can say as a loyal servant of many years is ‘God bless her and God Save The King.’ The last few days have been very traumatic but now we just have to carry on and get on with our work.

‘I’m just so glad that Emma and I were able to say our goodbye at Windsor where Her Majesty enjoyed riding her horses so much.’

And speaking in 2020, the Royal groom said Emma ‘has been a wonderful servant to Her Majesty and is still going strong at the age of 24’.

Her Majesty’s beloved horses  

The Monarch’s love for horses has been well-documented throughout her reign, whether it was breeding them, attending horse races or riding them around Windsor Castle. 

In 2020, Vanity Fair reported that the Queen, then 94, was ‘riding everyday’ around Windsor Castle while isolating with the late Prince Philip during the Coronavirus crisis. 

It is believed looking after horses was one of her favourite hobbies, which she would dedicate herself to during her time off duty in Balmoral or on the Sandringham estate, where she would retire for some well-deserved annual time off. 

She also personally named the horses who draw her carriages, such as Cleveland Bays and Windsor Greys, who are used for official engagements such as audiences, royal processions and the state opening of Parliament. 

Veteran broadcaster Brough Scott, 76, told how the Queen would delight in galloping around the racecourse before the start of the festival, wearing nothing but a silk headscarf for protection.

Speaking to Katie Nicholl for Vanity Fair, Scott admitted officials were probably uneasy about the jaunts but added ‘it’s the Queen’s course, so she can do what she wants’.

‘It’s hard to believe now because of her age, but she used to love racing down the course before racing officially began,’ Scott said. ‘It shows what a different time it was.’

Looking at photos of the Queen in one of her informal Ascot races, the veteran broadcaster added: ‘It’s unbelievable to see our young monarch galloping in her headscarf, with a great smile on her face. It makes her seem so normal.’

On 10 October, Her Majesty was awarded the honour due to her unwavering and lifelong dedication to the sport in the last eight decades.

John Warren, who oversees all of the monarch’s racing and horse breeding interests, said the recognition would be the source of a ‘lot of inner pride’ for the Queen.

It saw her become the first person to gain membership of the QIPCO British Champions Series Hall of Fame within the Special Contributor category after being chosen by an independent panel of industry experts for her outstanding contribution.

Sir Michael Stoute, who has trained more than 100 winners for Her Majesty, insisted she would be ‘thrilled’ at the news.

Mr Warren, the Queen’s bloodstock and racing adviser, said: ‘I suspect that the Queen will have a lot of inner pride in being invited into the Hall of Fame.

‘The Queen’s contribution to racing and breeding derives from a lifelong commitment. Her love of horses and their welfare comes with a deep understanding of what is required to breed, rear, train and ride a thoroughbred.

Her famous purple, gold braid and scarlet colours have recorded more than 1,800 winners since her first victory with Monaveen at Fontwell Park in 1949.

This season, she has recorded more winners than she did in 1957 when she was British flat racing’s Champion Owner.

In 2020, the Monarch’s head groom Terry Pendry told Horse and Hound she was a ‘fountain of knowledge in all things equine, you might say a living encyclopaedia.’

She bred and owned the winner of every British Classic – 2000 Guineas, 1000 Guineas, The Oaks and the St Leger – apart from The Derby, but is hoping for a win at Epsom to mark her Platinum Jubilee next year.

Ten-time Champion Trainer Sir Michael said: ‘Her Majesty will be thrilled to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. She richly deserves it because her contribution has been enormous. She loves it so much.

‘I’ve found that training for The Queen comes with no pressure. Because of her understanding, her deep knowledge and her thirst for more.

‘She’s always thinking ahead – what I’m going to do with this animal? Am I going to breed it? Who should I breed it to? Temperament, speed, stamina. She’s fascinated with the whole idea and we must remember, it’s a very long time that she’s been doing it.’

Her Majesty’s entry in the Hall of Fame read: ‘The Queen’s lifetime love of horses has never diminished, with her devotion as a passionate fan, an owner, breeder and ambassador unwavering.’

It described her as a ‘treasured figurehead’ who ‘has been part of racing’s fabric for as long as anyone can remember’.

It also references the monarch’s personal views on racing which she shared in a 1974 BBC documentary.

The Queen said: ‘My philosophy about racing is simple. I enjoy breeding a horse that is faster than other people’s. And to me, that is a gamble from a long way back.’

The Hall of Fame was launched in 2021 to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the QIPCO British Champion Series. 

Her favourite engagement of the year was the Royal Horse Show in Windsor, which she is believed to have attended every single year since it began as a wartime fundraising event back in 1943. Last year the show was cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic and went online instead. 

She was also a keen horse racing fan and often delighted with her very candid reactions when cheering on her horses, lifting her fist in the air or gleefully celebrating.   

In 2019, it was revealed the Queen had won £7.7million from her love of horse racing after winning more than 500 races over 31 years. 

Her Majesty won 534 races from 3,205 runs over her career as a racehorse owner, across both the flat and jump races in the UK and Ireland, new research reveals.

The most profitable year came in 2016, a record year in terms of winnings, with her horses earning £560,274 across the flat and jump seasons dating back to 1988, when records began, with Carlton House her top-earning horse across this period with £772,815 in winnings.

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