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Tony Parsons faces criticism after saying 'a salary of £150K doesn't make you super rich'

Controversy: Writer Man and Boy Parsons, 68, tweeted followers yesterday suggesting anyone thought a £150,000 salary made you super rich

Author Tony Parsons has sparked anger on social media after telling people that anyone who thinks a salary of £150,000 a year means you’re super rich ‘should go out more’.

The 68-year-old author of Man and Boy made the comments to his 51,000 Twitter followers on Monday, and has seen a flood of responses since he slammed him for his remarks, with many suggesting people who currently cannot afford to heat their homes might disagree with him.

Yesterday Chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng officially dropped plans to scrap the 45p tax rate – paid by workers on more than £150,000, less than 24 hours after Prime Minister Liz Truss insisted that She was ‘absolutely committed’.

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Controversy: Writer Man and Boy Parsons, 68, tweeted followers yesterday suggesting anyone thought a £150,000 salary made you super rich

Controversy: Writer Man and Boy Parsons, 68, tweeted followers yesterday suggesting anyone who thinks a £150,000 salary makes you super rich ‘should go out more’

Parsons told his followers: “If you think the men and women earning £150,000 a year are the ‘super rich’, you need to get out a little more.”

The 45p tax rate currently applies to people earning more than £150,000 a year.

It sees all income over £150,000 taxed at 45% – meaning for every pound over that the Treasury takes 45p.

While some agreed that a large mortgage and high standard of living meant such a salary could be easily gobbled up, the vast majority of people who responded to the author and journalist suggested he was out of touch.

@dave43law wrote: ‘If you’re a nurse with £30,000, paying for parking, facing exorbitant rent and having to go to a food bank to survive – a little more would suggest this tweet is pushed where the sun doesn’t shine.’

@RedWoman1552 writes: ‘That’s 7 times my salary. So, if I doubled my salary, I would also consider myself well off. If I tripled it, I would feel rich. So x7 is super rich for me. If you don’t feel rich living on £150,000, your budget isn’t good enough.

@TheAnthonyMark added: ‘What percentage of the population earns £150,000 or more? 1% or more? The median salary is around 32,000, so if you don’t think that’s hugely privileged compared to the vast majority of people, maybe it’s not us who need to go out a bit more.

His comments drew heavy criticism, with one person responding, “Have you ever been to the NE Tony?  £150,000 a year is beyond the wildest dreams of the vast majority.

His comments drew heavy criticism, with one person responding, “Have you ever been to the NE Tony? £150,000 a year is beyond the wildest dreams of the vast majority.

Kwasi Kwarteng officially dropped plans to scrap the 45p rate of tax paid by workers on more than £150,000 yesterday morning, less than 24 hours after the Prime Minister insisted she was there

Kwasi Kwarteng officially dropped plans to scrap the 45p tax rate – paid by workers on over £150,000 – yesterday morning, less than 24 hours after the Prime Minister insisted she was “ absolutely committed” in this regard.

What is the tax rate of 45p and who pays it?

The 45p tax rate applies to people earning more than £150,000 a year.

It sees all income over £150,000 taxed at 45% – meaning for every pound over that the Treasury takes 45p.

It affects approximately 500,000 adults – around 1% of the population – and brings around £6billion into the treasury every year.

This would have essentially removed the additional tax rate, making all income over £50,270 taxable at a flat rate of 40%.

The Chancellor argued the move would spur growth by allowing people to keep more of their money and encourage investment in the UK.

@JocastaMoney suggested: ‘If you think men and women earning £150,000 a year aren’t very wealthy, you need to hang around my area more.’

@TFMick1892 wrote: ‘Have you ever been to the NE Tony? £150,000 a year is beyond the wildest dreams of the vast majority of people.

@alrightPET pointed out that pay is ‘relative’ depending on where you live, saying, ‘It’s all relative, right? If you regularly date people who earn over £500,000, then – to quote Boris – earning £250,000 is ‘chicken’.

“By any standard, £150,000 is a very high salary. No, that doesn’t make anyone a millionaire, but it does make them really rich.

@hammer_mo defended Parsons’ comments saying: “If you call people who can afford food and heat ‘rich’ then those with 150k are probably ‘super rich’.

“But 150,000 isn’t money for a country mansion, a Ferrari and a yacht… it’s a mortgage on a 4 bedroom house in Surrey, plus change for a great holiday. Comfortable, not rich.

The 45p tax rate affects approximately 500,000 adults – around 1% of the population – and brings around £6billion into the treasury every year.

This would have essentially removed the additional tax rate, making all income over £50,270 taxable at a flat rate of 40%.

The Chancellor initially argued that scrapping the rate of tax would promote growth by allowing people to keep more of their money and encouraging investment in the UK.

After a barrage of criticism from opposition parties and their own MPs, the Prime Minister and Chancellor announced that the tax cut would not take place this morning.

The furious reaction was heightened by the worried reaction of the markets, as the pound tumbled and mortgage rates and interest rates soared after the mini-budget.

The stock market fell as traders spooked by what they saw as unfunded tax cuts at a time when the government announced it would borrow billions to freeze energy prices.

In a statement on Monday, Mr Kwarteng said the furor over the abolition of the 45p tax rate was

In a statement on Monday, Mr Kwarteng said the furor over the abolition of the 45p tax rate was “a huge distraction” from the rest of the mini budget – pictured with Prime Minister Liz Truss in Birmingham on Tuesday

And in Parliament, the anger over the proposals was such that there were suggestions that some Tory MPs might vote against the mini-budget when it comes to the House of Commons.

In a statement, Mr Kwarteng said the furor over the abolition of the 45p tax rate was ‘a huge distraction’ from the rest of the mini budget.

Speaking on Morning TV today, the Chancellor suggested he had decided to give up politics following the backlash and said he was doing so ‘in a spirit of contrition and humility “.

He told LBC Radio that other parts of the growth program had been well received, but “there is this element, which is the 45p rate, which was, I accept, controversial” and “people said they didn’t like it.”

“I’m listening, and I understand, and in a spirit of contrition and humility, I said ‘actually, that doesn’t make sense, we’re not going to go ahead with removing the rate “.”

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